How do you market the LTTL System?

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How do you market the LTTL System?

Postby Beach05 » Fri Sep 08, 2006 8:58 am

First, thank God for Barbara Sher and R2C! It has changed my life. What a relief!

Now, how does one become “Successfully Scanner”? When I came across the LTTL (Learn, Try, Teach, Leave) system in the book, it really struck a chord. I went back and reviewed all of my many jobs/careers and realized that LTTL is what I had done at each of them. Once I got to the “maintain the system” point, I was done and out of there (formerly viewed as lack of commitment).

Has anyone been able to successfully market the LTTL process to prospective employers/clients? What do you call it? How do you explain it? How do you sell it?

When my mid-life crisis started (long before R2C was written), I once again went looking for my “ONE true career path”. Industrial Engineering was the closest I could come to what I was good at – streamlining processes and/or physical space. Do we have any Industrial Engineer scanners out there? My Bachelor’s degree is in Architecture, and I have been happiest working in the Commercial Real Estate field. I looked at getting my Masters degree in Industrial Engineering, but the thought of more school and $ to potentially wind up disenchanted once more kept me from pursing this avenue. After reading R2C, I am glad I did not jump into it. If I could just streamline processes for companies, I think I would love it – I just don’t have a clue how to get a job doing that. Is there a job title for that type of work?

I am currently in the job market, so I would appreciate any insights! Thanks!
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Postby Laura » Mon Sep 11, 2006 9:38 am

That's a great question, Beach, and one I had wondered about myself. If you're marketing yourself as a consultant, I would think the LTTL model would be a great selling point, as you've already determined a good exit strategy. If you're going for employee positions, though, I'm not sure that disclosing your LTTL goals would necessarily be the best choice. A lot of employers aren't so forward-thinking and might take it as a lack of commitment to the job/company (which is bull, but hey...). I'm sure it would depend on the company and the industry involved, though; I look forward to seeing what other people think.
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Postby Britta » Tue Sep 12, 2006 11:12 pm

I worked in companies reacting differently, but it is known that you need different persons to start up and to maintain. I learned that in one of the courses I took on \"managing\" personnel. --Maybe should have used that knowledge for myself :o --
I just don't remember the context I got the info in and can't quote it. But if you use that argument even though you can't prove it may be helpful anyhow.
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Postby AlanHilton » Wed Sep 13, 2006 6:06 am

Hiya BeachOS ...

I am a test engineer for RF/microwave and have been consulting for the last several years. I suspect that industrial engineering may not be too different. Some ideas.

People who hire consultants do not really want to have them string along (get paid) for endless months or years afterwords. They'll hire you for a specific job or task. I make it clear that I'll leave enough documentation behind to allow anyone with enough skills to replicate/modify the project. If they want to hire me again then great. If not, we have already done \"business\" and I have fulfilled the requirements.

Go into sufficient detail in your initial proposal to budget time for the ending documentation. CFOs, who often are the real decision makers, will appreciate enough line items that lets them see what they are getting for the money. Make a business case for your LTTL approach. \"If you spend this much here then you will save that much there.\"

People hire consultants because they do not have the personnel to do the job or the expertise to do the job. Find a growth industry where time-to-market is important.

Specifically, industrial engineering and architecture, look into \"building commisioning.\" That's where they tweak the air conditioning, etc. It takes a while to tune the climate control systems so that the energy consumption is optimized. Direct dollar savings.

Schooling? Find a niche where they do not specifically teach what you do. You have enough schooling where you can get in the door. After that it is a matter of establishing the value you offer them in exchange for dollars or euros or ?

As for being a full time employee and selling the LTTL system, there is a place for the guy who comes to work and just does his/her job. There is also a place for folks who learn new things and blaze trails and leave a roadmap. Much of my employee career was doing things no one had done before (testing a new product) then writing up a procedure that would enable the bench tech to replicate the process. Much of the industry need ISO certification which is mostly process documentation. Sounds like LTTL to me. <grin>

QUESTION: What do you love most about industrial engineering? What do you love most about architecture? That's where the keys to what to do next are.
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Postby kazbah » Thu Sep 14, 2006 2:41 am

yeah i was going to suggest the consulting role might well fit the model perfectly ... also perhaps \"troubleshooting\" ... which could be a contract thing to. there are certainly corporations who will employ trouble shooters to deal with a particular situation .... could also be to do with something like a public share float, or acquisitions and mergers, which is a transitionary thing ... hey how about calling yourself a \"transition specialist\"?

if you are working in Commercial Real Estate, have you been working with developers? seems to me there must be a role with developers, after all they are the masters of get into a project, problem solve, market, get it sold and move on to the next thing ... maybe another positioning statement for yourself involves the word \"visionary\" or vision specialist ... or something along those lines, ie \"i come in at the initial stages of considering a development proposition, help scope out possible ideas for development and problem solving with a site or structure, make recommendations and then assist with/oversee the initial stages of implementation\"

If you have strong design and visualising skills, i imagine you could be very helpful to developers in providing several options, and helping them put together proposals for funding etc.

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Postby Beach05 » Wed Sep 20, 2006 11:22 am

Thanks for all of your comments. Lots of food for thought. Sounds like consulting is a more suitable approach for LTTL. To answer Alan, what do I love most about Industrial Engineering? I love efficiency – making things happen faster and better with less effort (does that make me a “bionic scanner”… for those old enough to remember Steve Austin?). What do I love about Architecture? Nothing. I spent 6 years in college getting my architecture degree and have spent the last 15 trying to stay out of the field. In my recent job search, I interviewed with a few architecture firms and my feelings were confirmed again. I just can’t go back there. To answer Kaz, yes, my most recent job was for a developer, but I am not skilled in “vision”. My mind is more practical...get things done…fast.

My job search has been a bust. I cannot go back to the things I have done, and have not found any immediate options that utilize my existing skills. So, I have resigned myself to working as a substitute in the elementary school cafeteria. :cry: At least it will make up the monthly family budget deficit for now. :idea: Maybe I’ll start a painting business….
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Postby Scenario Thinker » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:40 pm

Beach05 wrote: ...does that make me a “bionic scanner”… for those old enough to remember Steve Austin? ...

Oh yeah! :)

I'm with you on the architecture. Although I didn't get a degree in it, I have separate degrees in art and math, and I always thought architecture would be the perfect marriage of my talents. I almost went back to architectural school a few years ago.

But, you know what? I don't sit around thinking about how to build things and I don't build things. I sit around THINKING (in general), and how to make things better and more efficient.

In every job I've had, I've made things better. I've heard some people say, "Well, you can do that in any job". I've also heard that everybody puts their own stamp on a job and does it a certain way and it's more of a personal thing than just making things more efficient. But, then there are also a lot of people that just do the job the ways "It's always been done", and that have no motivation for looking at a job and thinking of ways to make it better.

But, I keep doing it, because that's what I like to do.
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Process & Improvement

Postby Beach05 » Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:24 am

Scenario Thinker...while browsing the boards, I came across your post \"OK, so I’m a Process and Improvement Guy\". I have also worked as a graphic artist and considered computer programming. Actually took some classes but didn't want to make another career \"mistake\". I'll check out this StrenghtFinder site. Anyway, just wanted you to know that your post was helpful. It's been about 10 months since that post - how is the \"new\" position going?
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Re: Process & Improvement

Postby Scenario Thinker » Sun Oct 15, 2006 4:45 am

Beach05 wrote:Anyway, just wanted you to know that your post was helpful. It's been about 10 months since that post - how is the "new" position going?

Hey, Beach, I'm glad it helped.

The position's good, yet I think I still yearn to apply more math into my day to day work.

I've very busy most of the time, and I'm sort of the go-to guy for almost everything. It's a weird job though, because it's not really a programmer, yet that background really helps. I have a couple other peers that are struggling, because they have no technical background.

Part of the fun of it is that I can write a little SAS program once in a while, I'm constantly fixing files using Access, and I'm always tinkering around with Excel, so there's a lot of variety manipulating all the data.
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