SCANNERS WITH HAPPY CAREERS

sticky mini-newsletter, questions and answers about Scanners, this site, the bbs, and you

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SCANNERS WITH HAPPY CAREERS

Postby BarbaraSher » Thu Aug 24, 2006 7:01 pm

If you're a Scanner who has--or ever had--a career/job/profession that was just great for you, let us know here.

I certainly do. I have an awful lot of interests, and had a terrible time choosing a major (never did choose one but accrued enough credits in anthropology to get a degree) and I've had a very interesting series of jobs working with people, slipping into counseling, designed workshops that attracted the attention of publishers, etc. etc.

I was just looking for a way to support my kids and did what I was good at. I love this kind of work, I love my websites and bulletin boards and books and public tv shows--and I love all my 'hobbies' and passions, the ones I never finish, too.
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Postby BarbaraSher » Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:18 pm

Here are some examples from the other SherBoard (including jobs for anthropologists!!??? Who knew?)

BarbaraSher.com
Barbara Sher Forums


W:How to work from home and travel O: finding an opportunity


Author Amarie
New User Joined: 07 Jun 2006
Posts: 2
Posted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 11:41
Post subject: W:How to work from home and travel
O: finding an opportunity

Hello everyone,

I have been searching for ways to work from home and travel occasionally throughout the year. I have a degree in Anthropology (cultural/biological), so conceivably I could travel to do research at various times throughout the year and then correspond and write reports from home (finding an organization has been harder than I thought!) I also have 7+ years (each) experience in customer service and education, including work with a tour company that led tours to East Asia. So this may be another option...to work from home signing people up for tours via internet/phone/fax, while traveling to the various locations offered. I am also interested in working with people who would like to volunteer, intern, work abroad.

I have scoured options in my small community/county. So the obstacle is: How do I find one of these worthwhile opportunities without relocating?

Currently I'm contacting various companies of interest I find on-line to see if they hire 'telecommuters'...

Thank you for your ideas and support!

~Amarie



maisie
Veteran Poster
Joined: 17 Mar 2004
Posts: 427
Location: Australia
Posted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 4:16 Post subject:
Check out
http://www.intrepidtravel.com.au
You don't have to be Australian to be a group leader for them.



dani
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Joined: 03 Feb 2005
Posts: 347
Location: Minnesota, Twin Cities area
Posted: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:48 Post subject:
I hope TwisterinTexas checks in--I think that's what she does.
Best,
dani



susiew
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Joined: 15 Aug 2005
Posts: 60
Location: SF Bay Area, California
Posted: Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:21 Post subject:
With your background in anthro and customer service you might be perfect as an ethnographer, which is a very hot area to be in for companies. Perhaps you could do studies in your area. Anyway - look into it! Wow I can't believe there is a site just for anthropologists. I'm sure you know about it but... http://www.anthrojob.com/

Susie
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blueroses
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Joined: 05 Jul 2006
Posts: 24
Posted: Thu Jul 13, 2006 7:33 Post subject:
I hope this isn't too far off track but have you ever considered teaching English as a Second Language? If you have experience in customer service and education I'm sure you could excel in this field (however, it is a bit of a stretch from anthropology). I know of one person that got into this after college and literally was paid to travel the whole world. He loved it! Well, it's a suggestion!

blueroses



newyork004
Experienced Poster

Joined: 10 Jun 2004
Posts: 54
Posted: Fri Aug 04, 2006 1:02 Post subject: I know a travel site
where you become a certified agent. You can use your agent status for discounts or launch a business. There's also a few really good ideas to make money from group travel like you're talking about. Email me if you want to discuss it further.

theinnovativetraveler@yahoo.com

thanks! good luck!

~ Susan



maggie2
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Joined: 23 Jun 2006
Posts: 8
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posted: Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:51 Post subject:
Hi Amarie,

I too want to travel and work. I finally found a way to do that, selling travel packages. They are absolutely the greatest price and the provide a way to travel too. If you'd like more information, feel free to email me at marg3049@telus.net

Marg Ruttan



kazbah
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Joined: 19 Mar 2001
Posts: 946
Location: NZ
Posted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 6:01 Post subject:
investigate becoming a travel writer ... a friend of mine did a correspondence course, and now is regularly published in a range of magazines .... he used the detailed diaries he kept while overseas for a few years as his starting point, but now often gets airlines to sponsor his trips to places of interest.

journalists go on famils around the world all the time.

does this appeal?



Kaz
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Postby BarbaraSher » Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:24 pm

Found more:



An actual CAREER for a scanner?!

PHHOPPER1
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Joined: 23 Aug 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Memphis area
Posted: Wed Aug 23, 2006 10:08


I am a project planner for a large corporation, and this kind of work has some real advantages for Scanners:
* Projects have starts and ends -- you're not signing up for life
* People working on projects come and go with career or assignment changes
* I'm always learning new skills, new tools, and new vocabulary with the changes that occur doing project work. I certainly don't always understand every aspect of a project, but I can learn a lot while contributing knowledge of my area.
* My skill set will translate to other corporations if I decide to move on
* Just about the time that I decide I'm willing to serve time to get away from the current team, that project will finish and I can move on and start over with a brand new feather in my cap
* I make a very good salary and benefits

Project Planners are much in demand, and becoming more so as companies scale back their IT and management staffs. There's professional certification you can pursue, and it's a real asset. But it's not REQUIRED at most companies. Major corporate-level projects can take months or even years, but small departmental projects can be significantly shorter. There's project work for people with specialization in Human Resources, IT, Finance, Customer Service and many other areas. You don't have to know EVERYTHING.

This kind of career would definitely NOT be a good choice for someone who \"hits the boredom wall\" after a couple of weeks, but it does offer much more variety than is typically available in a large corporate environment, so it might be something to consider for many who need company-paid benefits.


sgoldie
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Joined: 27 Jan 2003
Posts: 2153
Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:22 Post subject:
Sounds interesting. I wonder how something like that would be listed on Monster.com? Do you specialize in one of those areas, for instance IT, or do the projects go across several areas?


Scenario Thinker
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Joined: 15 Mar 2004
Posts: 2462
Location: near Chicago
Posted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 11:45 Post subject:
I've found improving processes can be applied to a lot of subjects, too:

http://www.barbarasher.com/boards/viewtopic.php?t=16698
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....o
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Postby BarbaraSher » Thu Aug 24, 2006 8:33 pm

OK, I'll stop now and go to sleep. Heading out for Atlanta workshop tomorrow.




Posted: Sat Jun 03, 2006 10:17
Subject: Great career for Scanners
I have found a Great Good Enough Job for me, that I would like to share with all the Scanners out there who are, like I was, frantically searching for that \"thing\" they can do, which will not suck the very life-juice out of them.

I stumbled upon this job quite by accident, when I was refinancing my house, back in September of 2005. I watched the appraiser do his thing around the house, and just when he was ready to leave, something made me ask him: \"How do you like your job?\" He started raving.

\"How do you become an appraiser and what kind of money can you make?\" I asked. He spent about 15 minutes telling me where to find the courses, how much they cost, how long it takes, what the business is like etc etc etc.

By the time he left, I knew this was the thing I'd been looking for!

Here in Florida, all you need is an 8 day course for about $600, and then you have to be a trainee under a state certified appraiser for 2000 hours/2 years before you go in for your own state certification. But, as a trainee you still make about $125-150 per job, which take anywhere from 4-6 hours. Heck, I didn't even make $20 per hour when I worked as a Human Resources Director slaving away 10-12 hours a day!

Once you're state certified you can go into business for yourself and keep the whole fee--about $350 or so.
Each state certified appraiser is allowed to have 4 trainees.

I just finished my \"in-office\" training, so as of now I am happily Working From Home. I receive the order via fax (that goes straight into my email), run out for about 1.5 - 2 hours for the inspection, and then sit at my kitchen table and fill in the report for another 2 - 3 hours. Then...I'm done for the day! And, I'm already home!

This job satisfies my need for:
1) Solitude (lots of it, please! I love, love, love to just sit and read and ponder.)

2) Some social interaction and getting out of the house. Chatting with a complete stranger for twenty minutes or so does it for me...

3) Work Less--Make More!

4) Work from home. Adios depressing cubicle and whiny water cooler huggers!

5) It's very detail oriented--which is one of the \"thangs\" I do really well.

6) Although the report is the same, each home--and therefore the approach to the content--is different every time, so you have to use the gray matter between your ears in order to do this job well.

7) Having time left over each day for: all those things I've been trying to squeeze in, but never had the time to do!

Sincerely,
Ami
Appraiser/Writer/Photographer/Virtual Assistant/Voice-over Talent/Proofreader/Makeup Artist/Former Business Manager/Jack-of-all-trades/General Figure-out-er'er and Handy-woman.



Thinker
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Joined: 10 Jun 2006
Posts: 96
Location: Australia
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 12:48 Post subject: Jobs for Scanners
I have put this elsewhere -

I thought a fine job for a performer type of Scanner might be as a wedding celebrant.

I imagine that each wedding would be a performance where the celebrant would be an important part of the process.

The job would not be boring since the people will change, the venue will change, the type of wedding would change with different vows etc., the opportunity to dress up and have a good time.....

Sound good ?

Thinker


BarbaraSher
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Posts: 4830
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 1:18 Post subject:
Sounds intriguing but mysterious. What is a 'celebrant'? That is, exactly what do they do?



Thinker
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Posts: 96
Location: Australia
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 5:47 Post subject:
Interesting that we have a cultural difference here :-))) I have been asked this question again elsewhere I posted this.

In Australia marriage celebrants are licenced to conduct marriages. They are a civilian person who is authorised (by training) to stand up in place of religious officials when a marriage takes place outside a church.

We have weddings here on the beaches, in parks, on planes, helicopters, mountains etc. and I am sure you do too. What do you call such a person in US ?

Many wedding planners in Aust. are also marriage celebrants, they plan the wedding, do the ceremony and book honeymoons as well. It's a thriving business.

But I know many just do the ceremony. They discuss with the bride and groom beforehand what vows they would like included, how they would like things to proceed, the order of the ceremony etc. Afterwards the celebrant gets to enjoy the food just as the minister would.


Does that explain things ?

Thinker



Chris the Hokie
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Joined: 20 Jun 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:11 Post subject:
Hi,

In the States, he or she is called a Justice of the Peace.


Thinker
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Joined: 10 Jun 2006
Posts: 96
Location: Australia
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 7:14 Post subject:
We have Justices of the Peace here in Australia too, but they don't do weddings, they just do legal documents etc.

Maybe someone might want to investigate starting up a marriage celebrant situation in US - here's more information.

http://www.celebrancy.edu.au/default.asp

Thinker


Tituba
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Joined: 29 Jul 2003
Posts: 4769
Location: Boston
Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:11 Post subject:
Quote:
Maybe someone might want to investigate starting up a marriage celebrant situation in US - here's more information.
We have those - we call them wedding planners.

Colliefeathers
Experienced Poster
Joined: 27 Jan 2004
Posts: 207

Posted: Tue Jun 20, 2006 4:33 Post subject: An appraiser.
A home appraiser.

Hmmm. Going to look up schools right NOW!

This may be just what I'm looking for.... and would tie into some other career ideas having to do with real estate and building homes.

Sounds like I could start making money fairly SOON, too.

Much needed!!! Thank you Barbara!



Colliefeathers
Experienced Poster
Joined: 27 Jan 2004
Posts: 207
Posted: Thu Jun 22, 2006 9:12 Post subject: Duooo.
I've researched a little bit!

Appraisal school is about 8 weeks - and costs anywhere from $650-$1200 depending on school.

I don't have that money though and can't get a loan. I asked my mother for the money and she said for me to not \"bounce around\" so much.

I'm in one school NOW. lol. One school that will take another 2-3 years to finish. I Do love the program though. Just need a 'good enough job' right NOW to live on and thought the appraiser job would be quick and good for me.

Thought this was funny anyway.

sighhh.



SusanH
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Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 23
Location: near Seattle
Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:15 Post subject:
Upon chasing something else down on the web, I found this link to Celebrant training in the United States and remembered the discussion here. http://www.celebrantusa.com

It seems a Celebrant is more than just a wedding planner. It is someone who officiates at not only weddings, but other types of ceremonies as well. This site is full of all sorts of good information. It could be a good Scanner job for someone who does not mind public speaking, enjoys working with people, and, of course, enjoys variety. They do have a distance training course.
Enjoy,
Susan



Tricia56
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Joined: 27 Mar 2004
Posts: 897
Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:42 Post subject:
1800 bucks! Plus in my state it is difficult to get licensed as a minister.


Tricia56
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Posts: 897

Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 10:57 Post subject:
Ok Appraiser school is a first step here in Indiana - what they don't tell you is that in order to get that 2000 hours of training on the job from a licensed appraiser - you have to find someone willing to train you - (remember you are potential competition) and you have to pay them a huge amount of money each month for the training - I have a friend who looked into it - she would have had to pay the appraiser - 3 thousand a month for the training! This was typical throughout my state! Divide 2000 hours by 40 hour week - but keep in mind that often you won't get that many houses to inspect to add up to 40 hours a week.


Thinker
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Joined: 10 Jun 2006
Posts: 96
Location: Australia
Posted: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:55
That's it Susan !
..and a good job for performers who like to be out front. Lots of women take on the job here in Aust.
Thinker


Thinker
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Joined: 10 Jun 2006
Posts: 96
Location: Australia
Posted: Fri Jul 07, 2006 6:27 Post subject:
I have added some under 'A Scanner's Job' Peter. They should have been here I know.
Thinker
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policy analyst

Postby Izbit » Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:27 am

I'm a policy analyst -- used to work for the government, now for an advocacy group. It does require some willingness to get deep into a subject and follow through on things. But, I get to do lots of different things with my day -- some short-term quick turnaround stuff, some longer term projects, and I get to spend lots of time reading about different things that interest me. It really is pretty much my perfect job.
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Postby BarbaraSher » Fri Aug 25, 2006 9:44 am

Thanks, Izbet. When it comes to following through on things I think we have to make a distinction between those times when you're really through and you know it, and to stay would get dreary and boring--which is toxic for anyone with a good brain and especially Scanners--

or

when we don't finish because we get pulled away by something else or we don't have things organized and, most of all, we don't have a 'Real Deadline.'

The first says you must leave and learn something new (and find a career that will allow you to do that, or just keep changing if it's okay with you).

The second says you must
a) read my book because I worked my butt off setting up systems that will allow you to follow through on things you love
and
b) set up an accountability system so you have deadlines that matter to you (also in the book).

And then, of course, there's that project or two that you really want to complete and make beautiful and send out to show the world how worthy and clever you are--and build a rep as an expert if you like, and become desireable to people who want to pay for your services, if you like.

And that's the almost last chapter of Refuse to Choose.

I don't think I left anything out that one would need. The only things I'll be adding in eBooks will be more tips and tricks for organizing and a virtual encyclopedia of great careers for Scanners (both of which I'm getting from dozens of emails and lots of great posts on this board).

I'm off to Atlanta in an hour, but when I get back, we can go through the book page by page and have a running discussion about it.

Or maybe we should set up a chat? That would be fun.
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Postby DMStauber » Sat Aug 26, 2006 10:16 pm

Freelance book indexing (see discussions on the other Sher board). Read books about a different topic every week, do work that uses your whole mind including creativity, make a decent living while wearing slippers. Not for everyone but I think it's suited to many scanners.

Do Mi
Intimate Landscapes in Colored Pencil
http://www.domistauberart.com
Facing the Text: Content and Structure in Book Indexing
http://www.domistauberindexing.com
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Postby BarbaraSher » Sun Aug 27, 2006 6:26 am

Yes, there are indexers on our board who say they love it for that very reason. Thanks!
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Postby careercoachdee » Mon Sep 04, 2006 9:32 am

Barbara,
I am a self identified scanner (also an ENFP--I do think there is a correlation between Myers-Briggs types and Scanner types).

What works for me careerwise, is that I have a flexible part time job at the University of WI in the Small Business Development Center where I coach/advise/inform callers (statewide and sometimes nation wide) about how to start their small biz/self employment etc. Each caller is different, and I find the variety of theri ideas and challenges and questions stimulating. I also teach a seminar in the Business School once a month on \"The First Steps\" to starting a business.

Additionally, I have my own career and life coaching practice which is also part time. I work with people who are seeking to change the way they work--to create more fulfillment and joy in their lives using their natural gifts and transferable skills. Each individual has a unique situation and I enjoy helping them make transitions. There is unlimited variety and I usually work with people on a short term basis--from one hour to 3months or more. (so I don't get bored) About every 8 weeks I conduct a workshop in a local bookstore on \"Right Livehood or Discover Your True Calling\" or a related topic.

Then there are the multiple projects that are potentially income producing: a series of children's books I am co-writing with my daughter, telecourses, e-books, another website for Entrepreneurial Collaborations (I spoke with Barabra Winters and Valerie Young on this--took their recent workshop here in Madison, WI), and am exploring creating a weekend cross generational retreat with my daughter--also a scanner. She just finished a Healing Arts Program in addition to her BA.

OK--nuff on that. I am curious to see others posts on this new board.
Thanks for writting the book!
Dee
careercoachdee
\"Where your gifts and the needs of the world cross...lies your calling\" Aristotle
http://www.careerlifecoaching.com
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Postby Nackie » Mon Sep 11, 2006 1:45 pm

Hello,
I'm new here and new to this topic. I'm in the middle of \"I could do anything if I only knew what...\", and just re-ad the chapter about scanners. I dropped my book, grabbed my laptop and started googling, needing and determined to learn more about these \"scanners\". Which is how I stumbled onto the Barbara Sher website, with the link to this amazing forum (thanks so much for the work on this site!)

I believe I'm a typical scanner--well generally I'm just told I'm a typical Gemini, interested in everything and insatiable in learning about it.

My career is great for scanners--I'm an event manager (PCO). I work in a middle sized event agency and am responsible for meetings, conferences, congresses and incentive travel with groups between 80 and 800 people. We work internationally, so I get to see a lot of the world, too.

A typical day in the office has my computer with at least 7 windows open (I work with a special event planner software, access, excel, word, PowerPoint and at least 2 google windows), at least 3 binders with 3 different projects open on my desk, usually with projects in different countries and always in different stages, the phone ringing and my emails plinging.

I don't know about the different types of scanners yet, but this is not a job for someone who loves solitude! :)

Nackie
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Postby BarbaraSher » Mon Sep 11, 2006 5:49 pm

Great post, Nackie! Welcome to the board.
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RN

Postby Colleen » Sun Oct 08, 2006 1:13 pm

I have found being a nurse to work for me. There are multiple areas of specialties, every patient, client, resident, person is different, and when something gets dull and ordinary, it is still easy to switch to a new area. Also I think I could become a \"perma-lancer\" in nursing if I change fields again.
Life is too short to take seriously.
Colleen
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Anyone a Project Planner?

Postby airess » Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:26 am

I saw PHHOPPER1's posting about being a project planner. Where can one get a certification? And most of all, how can one go from \"0 [experience] to Project Planner\" without a certification? I would love to hear more about this line of work because I actually don't know the actual job description and it sounds intriguing.
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Postby CareerWhizzard » Wed Oct 18, 2006 12:45 am

I agree that there appears to be a correlation between N on the MBTI and being a Scanner.

What works for me is a career/job I can create.

So I for my paying work I am a coach, a consultant, and a freelance writer.

For me as a person: an aspiring novelist, a photographer, a painter, a cyclist, a hiker..

It's taken me many years to get clear on the mix of things I want to do -- too darn many interests.

Oh, and I am an ENFP also. My Holland codes are AIS.

LL
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Postby deannaj » Sat Oct 21, 2006 1:43 pm

DMStauber wrote:Freelance book indexing (see discussions on the other Sher board). Read books about a different topic every week, do work that uses your whole mind including creativity, make a decent living while wearing slippers. Not for everyone but I think it's suited to many scanners.

Do Mi

I got so excited when I read this post! This is something I think I could do and love. I immediately went to the library and checked out a copy of the only book on indexing they had at my branch - Indexing Books by Nancy Mulvany. I've only read a chapter so far, but am very intrigued. I thought it was interesting that I had trouble finding entries in the index for becoming an indexer. :-)

I was a software engineer for 25 or 30 years, with work and salary dwindling after the Dot-Com bust. The bad news was losing great income (not to mention dealing with the resentment of my spouse.) The good news? The golden handcuffs were off, so I decided to see what parts of me got left behind in focussing on programming, parts of me I could pick back up. After all, although my MS was in computer science, my BA was in liberal arts (music major and English/philosophy minor.)

Well, I've tried teaching training classes. Not so fun. I've done some freelance programming. Okay but harder to find and lower rates than ever. I've done a lot of volunteer work - coordinating programs and workshops for my weavers guild, facilitating small groups at church. Many things I've considered require too much of an investment of time and money to get new credentials.

So my question for you is this - how daunting is the prospect for becoming an indexer? I can barely contain my enthusiasm for the prospect, and am really really hoping that this isn't just another of my magpie attractions.

Deanna
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